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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 10:29 pm 
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Hopefully I am asking this question in the right place here.

Anyway, has anyone here ever gotten weight loss surgery--either gastric sleeve surgery or bariatric surgery? If so, what was your experience with this like?


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:51 am 
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A guy I work with had the gastric sleeve surgery done. It was the only thing that helped him lose weight. He's lost about 100 lbs so far, and he had it done in January? Maybe February? He still exercises a bit, but mostly I think the weight loss is due to his surgery. He just can't eat as much as he used to.

He said the surgery wasn't too bad, and he hasn't had any side effects from it that he's told us about. It appears to have worked for him, and he tried every fad diet, etc. prior to this. All of them resulted in him weighing about 350 lbs at 5'8". At first I thought this would be another failure, but it's worked for him.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 12:44 pm 
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A guy I work with had the gastric sleeve surgery done. It was the only thing that helped him lose weight. He's lost about 100 lbs so far, and he had it done in January? Maybe February? He still exercises a bit, but mostly I think the weight loss is due to his surgery. He just can't eat as much as he used to.

He said the surgery wasn't too bad, and he hasn't had any side effects from it that he's told us about. It appears to have worked for him, and he tried every fad diet, etc. prior to this. All of them resulted in him weighing about 350 lbs at 5'8". At first I thought this would be another failure, but it's worked for him.
Very interesting!

For what it's worth, I myself am 6'0" and currently weigh around 230 lbs. It's not too bad, but please keep in mind that I also have almost no muscles. I was overweight for most or almost all of my life and thus I am wondering if eventual weight loss surgery is right for me.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 12:49 pm 
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You'd probably have to see if you would even qualify. 230 lbs isn't terribly overweight for 6'. There are likely guidelines for how overweight you have to be to get the surgery. This guy was moderately active, but still chubby despite his activity (softball and hockey). He blew out both of his knees, and needed ACL surgery on both in the span of two years. After the knee surgery his weight ballooned as he was no longer playing sports, and fad/yo-yo dieting just made him pack on more pounds. I assume he had a tendency to carry extra weight anyway, since he was active and still a bit big for his height, so when his activity level hit near zero, he blew up. He was suffering from sleep apnea and his blood pressure was high. His doctor suggested the gastric sleeve surgery to him, as I guess he thought my coworker was headed to an early grave.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 1:11 pm 
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First place to start is definitely with your doctor. It may not even be an option for you, and they can tell you that pretty quickly.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:13 pm 
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You'd probably have to see if you would even qualify. 230 lbs isn't terribly overweight for 6'. There are likely guidelines for how overweight you have to be to get the surgery. This guy was moderately active, but still chubby despite his activity (softball and hockey). He blew out both of his knees, and needed ACL surgery on both in the span of two years. After the knee surgery his weight ballooned as he was no longer playing sports, and fad/yo-yo dieting just made him pack on more pounds. I assume he had a tendency to carry extra weight anyway, since he was active and still a bit big for his height, so when his activity level hit near zero, he blew up. He was suffering from sleep apnea and his blood pressure was high. His doctor suggested the gastric sleeve surgery to him, as I guess he thought my coworker was headed to an early grave.
For what it's worth, I also had high blood pressure in the past, but I think that it's genetic for me since both my mom and my maternal grandmother also had high blood pressure. I also sometimes snore when I sleep--or at least I think I do.

I am very glad that things worked out great for your co-worker! :) Honestly, my weight right now might be the highest that it's ever been--though it's stabilized so far and isn't going much either up or down. Of course, I could have been a little bit heavier at my peak several years ago when I constantly went to all-you-can-eat buffets. In the grand scheme of things, though, my weight has generally been in the 180-230 pounds range. It's rarely been either below 180 pounds or above 230 pounds. Of course, as I wrote above, I myself have very little muscle--which in turn makes my weight more noticeable.

I don't know if I would actually qualify for any kind of weight loss surgery, but what I do know is that I often lack the discipline not to overeat. Specifically, I enjoy eating until I feel full and I've always felt that way. Even when I was little, I asked for two sandwiches at McDonald's instead of one because one sandwich simply wouldn't fill me. It's similar with Chick Fil-A; initially, I ate one sandwich there, but then I began switching to two sandwiches when I realized that only eating one sandwich simply wasn't filling enough for me. I really wish that there was a way for people such as myself to eat to our hearts' content while still being skinny. :(

It is a bit sad that I am unable to provide potential future sexual partners with an attractive body, though. I mean, I certainly want to permanently get rid of all of my body hair and facial hair once I will actually be able to afford full-body laser hair removal, but there don't appear to be any easy solutions to my weight. After all, it's not like it's currently possible to tinker with my genes to make me less plump. :(


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 3:14 pm 
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First place to start is definitely with your doctor. It may not even be an option for you, and they can tell you that pretty quickly.
That's probably true. Of course, what is a shame is that weight-loss methods other than surgery often don't work in the long(er)-run. :(


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 9:27 am 
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Of course, what is a shame is that weight-loss methods other than surgery often don't work in the long(er)-run. :(
That's absolutely not true. There are definitely solutions, the only problem is that most people don't like them, so they don't do them. Ergo, nothing changes. If this shit were easy, we'd all look like supermodels. It's simple - more exercise, and better food. Maybe not even less food, just different and better food.

When you say that you don't have much muscle, that's a great start point right there. Building muscle through exercise would allow you to eat relatively more, as muscle requires more energy for maintenance than fat. Someone who's 6' and 230lb of muscle, and works out, can eat 5000 calories a day and not gain weight. You'd be lucky if you could eat half that without packing it on.

Exercise is a component, but food - the type, timing, and amount of it - is 80% of the puzzle. Get that right, and add in some gentle exercise (even half an hour of brisk walking a day will make a difference) and weight would fall off you. For me personally, I enjoy exercise, and I really enjoy the fact that it lets me eat a shit-ton of food and keep a steady weight. I'd rather exercise and eat than not exercise and have to deny myself.

But as I said - committing to losing weight is a lifestyle, not something that you do until you get tired of it, and that's way too difficult for most people. You said it yourself - it's a discipline. But the interesting thing is that the better you eat ... when you wean yourself off the addictions you've probably built to salt, sugar and fat ... the better you WANT to eat. It gets easier, much easier, once you get over the hump.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:53 am 
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,,,,but food - the type, timing, and amount of it - is 80% of the puzzle. Get that right, and add in some gentle exercise (even half an hour of brisk walking a day will make a difference) and weight would fall off you.
But as I said - committing to losing weight is a lifestyle, not something that you do until you get tired of it, and that's way too difficult for most people.
Very true and I'm living proof of this, having tried every diet under the Sun only to pile it back on again and then some, until I took a much closer look at what I was eating and figuring out what were the foods causing the problem and what wasn't.

I discovered, complex and processed carbs were the killers for me, I could eat a pizza and an hour later want another one and could easily eat another. So now, I don't eat bread or pasta or cakes, pastries, spuds, parsnips, legumes, rice and sugar (which I never really ate anyway unless it was in a cake) etc......I still eat fruit and veg, meat, fish, butter, oil, cheese, nuts, eggs

Also arthritis in my knee has curtained my exercise, but I go for a walk every day for about 30 minutes while listening to an audio book (the walk is just as much to keep the joint mobile ) and voila, as Alicorn said without even trying I'm losing weight.

After most of my adult life I've hit upon a recipe that's easy for me to follow, I don't feel deprived in fact I feel less deprived because I can put oil on my salads, fry food in butter( or put a dollop on my veg) snack on cheese , all those this that are supposed to be anathema to losing weight. If I do feel the need for some bread I can still make bread-a-like with almond or coconut flour.
It also easy to stick with when eating out.

All those things I used to crave, my taste for them has just disappeared and because the food I'm eating is tasty and rich I don't eat anywhere near as much as I did when being on low fat diets. Not only am I losing weight, but with the reintroduction of good fats into my diet , my skin is looking a lot better too...

Now that works for me, it wouldn't work for someone else....as Alicorn said figuring out the intake is the biggest puzzle, even the act of that can be interesting and I do like solving a puzzle. After all this time I'm convinced 'off the shelf' is not the way to go for weight loss if we accept that we're all unique then surely a programme needs to encompass and support that uniqueness.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 12:28 pm 
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^^^

Absolutely right. People are SO different. My old bodybuilding training partner could cut weight for a competition on next to no carbs, and run on protein all day long. If I tried her diet, I would literally collapse. My body needs carbs to run. I eat what most traditional diets consider to be an obscene amount of carbs a day, and it totally works for me. But plain rice, oatmeal, fruit, and whole wheat bread make for much better results than pizza, Wonder Bread and soda.

There's so many other moving parts too - food allergies, gut health, exercise levels, the amount of sleep you get, hormone levels (at least with Cali being male, he has less to worry about on that front!). Consistent and sustainable weight loss involves addressing all of these. And one thing I've found is that traditional doctors are next to useless when it comes to helping with weight management. I've got infinitely better advice and results from my naturopath, nutritionist and chiropractor than I have from my doctors over the last few years.

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