The Childfree Life

When having it all, means not having kids
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:48 am 
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Cats...first of all, I don't see things like this in a dog versus cat frame of mind. I like them both, and other animals as well. If I had a billion dolllars, I'd probably open a sanctuary for animals, along with a paramilitary arm that "liquidates" people who abuse animals. :twisted:

I think I just identify more with dogs. They come in bigger sizes than cats (and in what seems to be more varieties, at least when talking about cats/dogs you'd have as a house pet). Both dogs and cats have personalities, I just like the inherent goofiness that so many dogs possess.

Our current dog is almost the perfect compromise. She's an English Setter, but she's much, much more aloof than most dogs. Many days, I do get the feeling she tolerates us more than she cares for us. She's definitely not overly affectionate.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:58 am 
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it can never seem to make up it's mind if it wants to be in or out
That's not a problem at our house. Our kitties don't go outside. There are coyotes up in the hills that would love a kitty snack.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 10:16 am 
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^^Same here. Both my cats are strictly indoors-only. I saw a photo last year on Facebook that someone in my neighbourhood had taken of a pair of coyotes literally taking a stroll down the middle of my street (and I live in a fairly large city). Definitely not going to take any chances!


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:28 pm 
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Reading the 'dog people' posts here kind of leaves me flabbergasted. If don't want kids, then why have a dog? My cat doesn't jump on me, don't wreak havoc in the house, isn't needy, and doesn't get into things she shouldn't mess with. She's clean, quiet, doesn't smell, and minds her own business. It's like what Jack Byrnes says in Meet the Parents: Jack: You see, Greg, when you yell at a dog, his tail will go between his legs and cover his genitals, his ears will go down. A dog is very easy to break, but cats make you work for their affection. They don't sell out.
I'm actually flabbergasted by the dog hate.

I have two dogs, a 10 year old labrador and a 2 year old English Setter (my husband's hunting dog), and they are in no way as needy as your average small child. They need walks, yes, but this is enjoyable and practically entertainment for us. Other then that, there's a few minutes of feeding time and they mostly hang out in the same room we are in, but they are easy going and pleasant to be around. In what world is this as needy as a child?

I love dogs... more then most humans, actually. You don't have to like them, it's really a matter of taste, but dogs are not equivalent to kids in terms of neediness, not even close. They may extend our day by as much as an hour but I don't know any child that requires such little time. They don't require story readings, set bedtimes, or college educations. :) Definitely not same as kids!

-Rowan


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2018 9:44 pm 
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My parents have a Jack Russell and a Newfoundland. The Newfie and the JR have been trained to wait on their food, as the Newfie weighs maybe 5 lbs less than my father. He would be a terror if he had the Jack Russell's energy and wasn't trained. The Jack Russell is energetic, to say the least. He's well-trained, as they can be really destructive and annoying if they aren't trained well, and kept busy. Even though he knows he's to wait on chow, he still has problems with being patient. He stands at attention, and if you take too long, he'll start jumping up and down in place, or turning in circles. I guess he's got to get it out of his system some way. That said, he doesn't jump on people, bark incessantly, or act aggressively. He will get on the furniture, and I think my parents have conceded that battle. The Newfie pretty much lays about. He will walk around, but really just to find somewhere new to sleep. He rarely ever barks, and didn't have to be trained not to jump. He's so big, he's already on your level, so no need to jump.
It’s been a little over a year now, that I’ve become obsessed with Newfoundlands, I haven’t decided to take the leap and get one, because I’ve never had a dog, always been a cat person, so I am afraid to become a poor dog owner that fails at discipline.
Was it easy for your parents to train the Newfie???


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 5:25 am 
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They got him as "rescue" dog. He was surrendered by people who apparently didn't realise how gigantic he'd get, or how slobbery he'd be. He was pretty well-trained when they got him. I believe the rescue lady worked with him, and he's pretty obedient by nature, so he's not really a difficult dog. Not being very high-energy helps. He'd rather sleep, or sit, than need a "job". He's a gentle dog, so he responds well to commands. The Jack Russell, on the other hand, was tough. Very eager to please, but also very "ADD". He has so much energy that his attention span is short if you don't keep him engaged with a job during training. He will listen, but he gets distracted by things like squirrels, or birds - anything to chase. My mother said he was both easy and difficult to train because while he wants to listen, and wants to do whatever task you give him, he gets distracted easily. Between the two, Jack Russells are the more difficult dogs, whilst the Newfies are pretty laid back. I would say they are very easy to train, as they are patient and relatively low-activity, not at all like the perpetual motion of the Jack Russell.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 7:16 am 
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I would happily work at CO's animal rescue. but the idea of voluntarily working at an orphanage or being a foster parent, or a teacher, chaperone, etc, etc NOPE.
I've had both cats and dogs as part of my life. Right now I have a "my cat" shaped hole in my heart. I miss MY cat. I like cats quite a bit, though my dog was clearly the favorite between the two once I got her. She's adopted as a puppy, Australian Shepherd mix. black and tan, 35 lbs on a good day, and sometimes she's annoying AF.
However, I find her about one billion times better than any child. Sometimes she's a toddler. can't be left alone, wants something from me but won't articulate it, doesn't speak english, needs to be fed and watered and let out to potty, needs to be taught skills to get along in life....

i liken it to tomatoes. I don't like ketchup, I'm ok with some cooked tomatoes, and generally appreciate and enjoy raw tomatoes. they're all nearly the same thing, but no. dogs are work, sure, but much different than children to me.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 9:15 am 
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My SIL had a Jack Russell and he was like that. Very eager to please but also the most hyper dog I've ever met. He was a tightly wound bundle of energy.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 5:45 pm 
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I would say the biggest drawbacks to Newfies are the slobber, and the shedding. Bear (the Newfie) slobbers a bit. It's not like he's just drooling all the time, like some dogs do, but he is a little more drooly than a dog with no jowls. The shedding of the seasonal coat is an experience. You could make another dog from the fur that is shed. You have to brush out a lot of fur when they are shedding, and it can make a mess in the house. Newfies are also prone to dysplasia, so their hips and elbows should be checked. Bear eats a bit, but I think he's like a draft horse in that he actually consumes less proportionately than the far smaller Jack Russell. I suppose when you have the energy of a squirrel on cocaine and amphetamines, you burn some calories.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 6:51 pm 
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A big part of me wanting a Newfie is their laid back, non energetic usual manner.
The shedding is not much of a problem, the drooling may be though.
I’ve really been looking into the breed very thoroughly, and I always seem to find that all Newfie owners adore the breed and say it’s the gentlest dog around.
I’m still unsure because I’ve never had dogs, and my socializing is almost non existant, so the idea of having to socialize a dog for its own good and behaviour gives me a bit of anxiety that I won’t be able to give the dog a good life. Along with a bit of fear of being a bad dog owner and ending up with a rebel misbehaved 150lb dog.

I may just end up adopting a couple of cats instead.

But, time will tell. I also really really want a huge gentle cuddly dog!


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